Drop of Whisky

I like whisky, you like whisky, we all like whisky

Tag: chivas

A 12 year Glenkinchie

So my “green apple” might be your “kiwi”. I know they say Lowland malts are “light”. This is the only one I’ve tried, but from what I gather it’s not a triple-distilled malt (like Auchentoshan, which is an Irish whiskey produced in Scotland, nothing wrong with that). Comparing it to unpeated Highlands and Speysiders I wouldn’t call it light, at least not like the much maligned light beers. It’s fresh but no less substance than Glenmorangie, Glenlivet, Glenfiddich, Old Pulteney (perhaps on par with Old Pulteney in terms of interest). It’s not syrupy like Aberlour or Macallan, has its own pleasant character. FWIW I rarely think of different malts as “better” or “worse”, I only compare them to contrast their features. There are very few I didn’t like (Singleton of Glendullan 12). And I like them all – the light bourbon-cask malts like Glenmo10, the syrupy sherry monsters and the peaty Islay bruisers, all depends on the mood, weather and company. Sometimes I even taste bottom shelf blends and I’ve found a few that surprised me, though single malt will always be my preference. I recommend this malt on its own, however it’s also a good way to see if you might enjoy peat. Tasting an Islay bruiser like Laphroaig, Ardbeg or Lagavulin might scare you off (or you might become an instant addict). Instead try this or Glen Moray Peated or Highland Park. The peat is very tame but enough to get you acclimated to it.

Like a previous review says, this is light years ahead of any Jack Daniels, and at only a few dollars more a bottle (where I live). This is a spirit my cabinet will never be without. Light years ahead of any Jack Daniels I have tasted. Nice warming feeling with plenty of taste! Whiskey doesn’t get much better than this. Balanced sweetness. A whiskey man’s whiskey. Quite pleasant, creamy, not complicated. A nice introduction to bourbon. So I have to be honest. I gave up on whiskey after only having one type (i know i’m a horrible person) which was Jack Daniels. I had Jack and I absolutely hated it I thought it was far too bitter and it tasted as though someone had shoved wet woodchips down my throat. Well we had a Firefly party last night at our local bar (Firefly is a western tv show) and I saw this Frontier whiskey sitting on the bar. Well I said what the hell it’s just for the party and I tried some on the rocks.

These are the first two whiskies on the market that have been made from 100% peated barley at the distillery. And while both have good stories, the Peat Week stands out—on the tongue, for its sweetness and elsewhere for its inspiration story. Once a year since 2002, always during the distillery’s maintenance period, The Balvenie’s distillery manager (at the time) Ian Miller would run peated barley through the distillation process. It could only be done during this one week, at this one time of year, because the peat scent is so strong and pervasive it would impact all other production. This week was quite literally known as Peat Week. 14 years later, that 2002 spirit was bottled and now named after the week during which it’s produced. It was aged solely in American Oak casks and hits the market at a strong 48.3% ABV. But why even explore peat at a brand known for smooth, sweet spirits? Gemma Paterson, the Balvenie’s Brand Ambassador, explains that it’s about “harking back to the old way whisky was made. Most malts produced in Scotland were heavily peated because peat is—and was—a fuel source.

There aren’t many distilleries that have universal appeal. Some people adore rich, sherried whiskies; other people despise them. Some love lean, medicinal styles; others run a mile. But there is one whisky distillery that gets praise from all quarters: Lagavulin. Part of the big-hitting trio of distilleries on Islay’s southern coast, Lagavulin celebrates its 200th anniversary this year, and is about to launch a special limited-edition bottling: Lagavulin 8 Year Old. We were lucky enough to try a sneak preview of the whisky before it goes on sale in a few weeks’ time – and it didn’t disappoint. Lagavulin’s distillery manager Georgie Crawford told us: ‘I grew up in a pub in Port Ellen, and I was always of the opinion that Lagavulin was the premium single malt. When I started out, I wanted to be able to drink Lagavulin, but I had this perception that it was too powerful and smoky, so I started with Rosebank, then went on to Mortlach and Dailuaine. ‘With this new 8 Year Old, we were trying to create something as a tribute to Alfred Barnard, and I think the team has absolutely knocked it out of the park. It doesn’t have the big bite of the 12 Year Old; it’s more refined. I find it challenging and serene at the same time. So, how does it taste? Nose: Cracked black pepper and aromatic woodsmoke at first, then fresh notes of orange and lemon peel. Appealing aromas of bonfires, hot shells and a touch of smoked meat. A little water brings out aromas of peach and green apple. Palate: More woodsmoke, plus crunchy oatmeal and honeyed fruit. Rich mouthfeel, with notes of tobacco, bonfire embers and a peppery, spicy note.

Palate: At first it’s salty and smoky, like taking in the sea spray from the deck of an old diesel-powered ferry. Then things take a more savory turn—charred meat, grilled nectarines, chili powder—that takes things in a culinary direction. Vital Stats: 51.2%, no age statement. Appearance: Light mid gold. Nose: Shy and nectar-like. Marzipan croissant, cheese Danish, brioche, plus freshly waxed hardwood floor and clean wool sweater. Creamy, toasty, strange, and a bit tingly in the nose. Palate: Extremely well integrated, with a very crescendo-like feel. Rich papaya, mango, and banana linger on the palate, plus yeated bread and caneles. There’s a touch of very gentle milk chocolate and a whisper of elderflower. The finish is endless, really feeling as if it clings to your tongue. Water brings out more smoky and maritime notes, plus milky white corn and marzipan. Nose: Classic Lagavulin here. Banana and dried mango, puffs of wet smoke, sandalwood, incense, rich malt syrup, and that damp wool sweater you wore to a barbecue and left wadded up in your trunk. Palate: Very sweet and a little earthy up front, with some dried banana, strong smoke, clove, burnt caramel, salty dark caramel, and lots of saline maritime goodness, with mint, cannabis, and lanolin peeking through. The long finish is oddly cooling and refreshing, with spearmint, eucalyptus, ash, and salt.

If you beloved this article and also you would like to collect more info with regards to whisky nicely visit our web site.

Get To Know Glenkinchie

Have you ever wanted to travel to Scotland with a likeminded group of whisky lovers? This summer, September 2-9, we’re co-sponsoring our first-ever whisky-themed trip with Customized Journeys, a boutique travel agency specializing in memorable vacations. Interested in coming along? Check out the trip page here. Of the many distilleries we’ll visit on our upcoming trip to Scotland, Glenkinchie is the only Lowland member of the bunch. Located in East Lothian, a district of bucolic rural landscapes and gently rolling fields, it’s a quick trip from the brooding city of Edinburgh, yet a world apart. Glenkinchie Distillery is owned by Diageo. Its malt goes into blends like Haig’s and Dewars, and its flagship 12-year-old single malt (sometimes referred to as the “Edinburgh Malt” for its proximity to the city) is part of Diageo’s Classic Malts of Scotland collection. The Glenkinchie Distillery in its current form was founded in 1880, although Diageo traces its lineage back to 1825, the year the Milton Distillery commenced production on the same site. It’s fantastic over ice and has a drink-ability that’s almost dangerous. This will always be on my shelf. JD is good but this is far more interesting – the complexity of the flavors and how they fit well together is quite impressive. Delicious, smooth. Not too firey, vanilla and blackcurrant, easy to drink straight. Sweet, easy drinking, well priced. Does it get any better? I really do like Bulleit Bourbon, mainly because of it’s high rye content (I do love my rye whiskeys). It’s reasonably priced and very good value for money, and makes a great Old Fashioned. Obviously it’s no W L Weller, Bookers or Pappy, but for a utility Bourbon I think it’s great. Buffalo Trace is possibly my favourite utility Bourbon, but I love the peppery start (it’s that rye again) and smooth finish of the Bulleit. Tried this bourbon for the first time and was very pleased with it.

The pie isn’t overly sweet but is rich in baking spices such as cinnamon, ginger and nutmeg. As for The Balvenie Caribbean Cask 14 Year Old it gives light sweetness which brings out a similar sweetness in the pie. The ginger in the pie works well with the pineapple notes found in the Caribbean Rum cask finish, which also adds a peppery spiciness that compliments the abundance of baking spices found in the pie. This is a classic pie (remember American Pie movie?) with classic whisky, pairing the fruit pie and DoubleWood 12 perfectly. The rich stewed fruit notes from the DoubleWood 12 whisky, the apples in pie and the cinnamon in both play nicely together. The sherry cask finish brings the baking spices (nutmeg, cinnamon) and the rich stone fruit flavours (plum, cherry, date) of the DoubleWood 12 to the forefront. These pair with the sweetness of the apples. The room itself is large, but it is home to only a single pair of stills. Having said that, at 30,963 litres, Glenkinchie’s wash still is the largest in Scotland. The spirit safe is given pride of place towards one end of the still room, and if production is under way it is possible to see the clear spirit pouring through the safe. When we visited Glenkinchie it was not possible to visit the bonded warehouse, but plans were in place to add this atmospheric and memorable element of the process to the distillery tours. Either way, you finish your tour in the very nicely done tasting area, where you can sample Glenkinchie or a number of other single malt whiskies from distilleries owned by Diageo. Glenkinchie Distillery has origins dating back at least as far as 1837, when local farmers John and George Rate are recorded as holding a licence to distill whisky at what was known at the time as Glen Kinchie. As has already been mentioned the floor maltings closed in 1968, which gave the space needed for the very early distillery visitor centre that opened the following year. Today Glenkinchie receives some 25,000 visitors each year, and is a great half day out for anyone visiting the Edinburgh area.

Bottled at 41.6% abv, The Balvenie Fifty: Marriage 0962 is made from four American oak casks aged 50 years or over, selected by malt master David Stewart. The expression is a result of Stewart’s “ongoing commitment to experimentation and innovation”. The numbers ‘0962’ relate to the month and year that Stewart joined William Grant & Sons. On the nose, the expression has hints of brown sugar, toffee and spiced ground ginger. The palate has “delicate notes of oak, layered with maple syrup, tangy citrus and a trace of nutmeg, developing into a delicious honeyed sweetness”, and leads to a “long and lingering” finish. Stewart said: “Marrying aged whisky stocks is undoubtedly one of the most challenging, yet enjoyable facets of my role as The Balvenie malt master. “This was a chance to explore the furthest reaches of our precious aged stocks and see how their extremes could be controlled and combined. Despite enjoying more than 55 years in the business, I’m still discovering and learning new things about the science and art of whisky making. “The creation of Marriage 0962 took months of patience to complete, as we’re dealing with liquids with extremes in abv, taste and age. Marriage 0962 is presented in a wooden tube comprised of 50 layers, 48 of walnut and two of brass, created by Scottish wood craftsman Sam Chinnery. It also comes with an etched brass certificate and bottle glorifier, inscribed with the tasting notes of each cask. The design of the glass decanter is a “sleek reinterpretation” of the classic Balvenie bottle shape, which mirrors the distillery’s copper stills. The Balvenie Fifty: Marriage 0962 will launch in the UK in August. Twelve bottles will be available at specialist whisky retailers including Harrods, Hedonism and Selfridges.

In case you have just about any inquiries about wherever and the best way to utilize whisky, you possibly can email us on our own page.

Get To Know Glenkinchie

Have you ever wanted to travel to Scotland with a likeminded group of whisky lovers? This summer, September 2-9, we’re co-sponsoring our first-ever whisky-themed trip with Customized Journeys, a boutique travel agency specializing in memorable vacations. Interested in coming along? Check out the trip page here. Of the many distilleries we’ll visit on our upcoming trip to Scotland, Glenkinchie is the only Lowland member of the bunch. Located in East Lothian, a district of bucolic rural landscapes and gently rolling fields, it’s a quick trip from the brooding city of Edinburgh, yet a world apart. Glenkinchie Distillery is owned by Diageo. Its malt goes into blends like Haig’s and Dewars, and its flagship 12-year-old single malt (sometimes referred to as the “Edinburgh Malt” for its proximity to the city) is part of Diageo’s Classic Malts of Scotland collection. The Glenkinchie Distillery in its current form was founded in 1880, although Diageo traces its lineage back to 1825, the year the Milton Distillery commenced production on the same site. It’s fantastic over ice and has a drink-ability that’s almost dangerous. This will always be on my shelf. JD is good but this is far more interesting – the complexity of the flavors and how they fit well together is quite impressive. Delicious, smooth. Not too firey, vanilla and blackcurrant, easy to drink straight. Sweet, easy drinking, well priced. Does it get any better? I really do like Bulleit Bourbon, mainly because of it’s high rye content (I do love my rye whiskeys). It’s reasonably priced and very good value for money, and makes a great Old Fashioned. Obviously it’s no W L Weller, Bookers or Pappy, but for a utility Bourbon I think it’s great. Buffalo Trace is possibly my favourite utility Bourbon, but I love the peppery start (it’s that rye again) and smooth finish of the Bulleit. Tried this bourbon for the first time and was very pleased with it.

The pie isn’t overly sweet but is rich in baking spices such as cinnamon, ginger and nutmeg. As for The Balvenie Caribbean Cask 14 Year Old it gives light sweetness which brings out a similar sweetness in the pie. The ginger in the pie works well with the pineapple notes found in the Caribbean Rum cask finish, which also adds a peppery spiciness that compliments the abundance of baking spices found in the pie. This is a classic pie (remember American Pie movie?) with classic whisky, pairing the fruit pie and DoubleWood 12 perfectly. The rich stewed fruit notes from the DoubleWood 12 whisky, the apples in pie and the cinnamon in both play nicely together. The sherry cask finish brings the baking spices (nutmeg, cinnamon) and the rich stone fruit flavours (plum, cherry, date) of the DoubleWood 12 to the forefront. These pair with the sweetness of the apples. The room itself is large, but it is home to only a single pair of stills. Having said that, at 30,963 litres, Glenkinchie’s wash still is the largest in Scotland. The spirit safe is given pride of place towards one end of the still room, and if production is under way it is possible to see the clear spirit pouring through the safe. When we visited Glenkinchie it was not possible to visit the bonded warehouse, but plans were in place to add this atmospheric and memorable element of the process to the distillery tours. Either way, you finish your tour in the very nicely done tasting area, where you can sample Glenkinchie or a number of other single malt whiskies from distilleries owned by Diageo. Glenkinchie Distillery has origins dating back at least as far as 1837, when local farmers John and George Rate are recorded as holding a licence to distill whisky at what was known at the time as Glen Kinchie. As has already been mentioned the floor maltings closed in 1968, which gave the space needed for the very early distillery visitor centre that opened the following year. Today Glenkinchie receives some 25,000 visitors each year, and is a great half day out for anyone visiting the Edinburgh area.

Bottled at 41.6% abv, The Balvenie Fifty: Marriage 0962 is made from four American oak casks aged 50 years or over, selected by malt master David Stewart. The expression is a result of Stewart’s “ongoing commitment to experimentation and innovation”. The numbers ‘0962’ relate to the month and year that Stewart joined William Grant & Sons. On the nose, the expression has hints of brown sugar, toffee and spiced ground ginger. The palate has “delicate notes of oak, layered with maple syrup, tangy citrus and a trace of nutmeg, developing into a delicious honeyed sweetness”, and leads to a “long and lingering” finish. Stewart said: “Marrying aged whisky stocks is undoubtedly one of the most challenging, yet enjoyable facets of my role as The Balvenie malt master. “This was a chance to explore the furthest reaches of our precious aged stocks and see how their extremes could be controlled and combined. Despite enjoying more than 55 years in the business, I’m still discovering and learning new things about the science and art of whisky making. “The creation of Marriage 0962 took months of patience to complete, as we’re dealing with liquids with extremes in abv, taste and age. Marriage 0962 is presented in a wooden tube comprised of 50 layers, 48 of walnut and two of brass, created by Scottish wood craftsman Sam Chinnery. It also comes with an etched brass certificate and bottle glorifier, inscribed with the tasting notes of each cask. The design of the glass decanter is a “sleek reinterpretation” of the classic Balvenie bottle shape, which mirrors the distillery’s copper stills. The Balvenie Fifty: Marriage 0962 will launch in the UK in August. Twelve bottles will be available at specialist whisky retailers including Harrods, Hedonism and Selfridges.

Should you have almost any queries regarding exactly where and the best way to use whisky, you are able to call us at the web page.

Variations Among Whiskys Of The Highlands

It was first produced in Bourbon county, Kentucky, and the name bourbon eventually became a general term for similar corn-mash whiskeys. Sour mashes, used mainly in bourbon production, are fermented with yeast, including a portion of previously fermented yeast; other whiskeys are made from sweet mashes, employing only fresh yeast. In the United States, straight whiskeys are named for the grains predominating in the mash, with at least 51 percent required for whiskeys designated as straight. If a mash of at least 51 percent barley malt is employed, the product is straight malt whiskey; if rye malt is used, it is straight rye whiskey. Straight bourbon mashes contain at least 51 percent corn; straight corn-whiskey mashes contain at least 80 percent. Combinations of similar straight whiskeys of different distillation periods or from different distillers are designated as blended, rather than straight. Whiskeys are consumed both unmixed and mixed in cocktails, punches, and highballs. The United States is the world’s largest producer and consumer of whiskey. I feel I should preface this review: I don’t know anything about Game of Thrones. I’ve never read the books. I’ve never watched a single episode. While the rest of the world has been going bonkers over “white walkers” and “the Iron Throne”—phrases I learned via Wikipedia—I have been doing…something else. Living under a rock, I guess. At first I thought that meant I shouldn’t review these whiskies, but then I reconsidered. The Internet is full of commentary, analysis, memes, and other detritus related to Game of Thrones. It doesn’t need more. And perhaps this glaring blind spot in my pop culture knowledge actually gives me an advantage as a reviewer, in that I can taste Diageo’s Game of Thrones releases simply as whiskies, not as some kind of titillating fan service. Some background, for those who have been living under neighboring rocks. Earlier this fall Diageo announced the release of several Game of Thrones-themed whiskies, including a range of eight single malts. Whiskies from Glendullan, Dalwhinnie, Cardhu, Royal Lochnagar, Oban, Talisker, Clynelish, and Lagavulin are all accounted for, each one representing a different house or group from the show.

Lagavulin is one of the three Kildalton Distilleries in the south of Islay and sits comfortably in between Ardbeg and Laphroaig at the “Hollow by the Mill”, translated from the Gaelic lag a’mhuilin. By 1837 there was only the one distillery, “Lagavulin” occupied by Donald Johnston. The still house was rebuilt in 1962 and incorporated the stills of the Malt Mill Distillery and in 1996 a new mashtun was installed, and automated controls put in place. The visitor centre dates back to 1998 and was established in the buildings that once were the maltings and kiln of Malt Mill Distillery. Lagavulin Single Malt Whisky is characterized by its strong peat flavour and iodine overtones. The iodine flavour tends to divide tasters into love it or hate it groups with no middle ground, and it may not be suitable for new Scotch drinkers. The standard Lagavulin single malt is 16 years old, though they have also released a 12 year old cask strength variety, as well as their Distiller’s edition, finished in Pedro-Ximenez casks. Phenol levels running at 40 p.p.m. Lagavulin is produced by White Horse Distillers which is owned by United Distillers & Vinters which in turn is owned by Diageo plc. Lagavulin was chosen to represent Islay Single Malts in UDV’s Classic Malts of Scotland.

But underneath that, there’s a great big ocean of sweet, caramelized malt, all baked apples and cobbler crust. Plenty of industrial character, too—soot, rubber, hot electrical equipment, and that magical, grimy petrichor of a dirty urban sidewalk after a summer’s rain. Palate: You know that saying “turns to ashes in your mouth? ” This is like the opposite. At first, it’s like a mouthful of recently extinguished ashes—charred, powdery, astringent—but then a lush, maritime garden quickly comes into Technicolor focus. Basically, Lagavulin 16 tastes just like a real boat: varnish, diesel, salty nets, ocean spray, and the sticky lanolin-rich smell of a thick wool sweater a hardworking man has been wearing one too many days in a row. Over several minutes in the glass, ghosts of fruit emerge—orange and red cherry, mostly—but never seem to break through the low-hanging haze. That’s alright – a suggestion is enough. Lagavulin 16-Year-Old is satisfying in a way that many other things are not. You might not like it, but if you enjoy whisky, it is essential for you to buy a bottle of Lagavulin 16, and drink it. It might take you the rest of your life, but it’s important.

This is one of those rare, perfect occasions on which the essence of this story can really, truly be communicated by the headline alone. Nick Offerman, painted bronze, slowly sipped Lagavulin at a Chicago Blackhawks game. That’s it. That’s what happened. Look at the picture. The once and forever star of the world’s best yule log video last night recreated that experience before a Chicago Blackhawks game. The “statue induction ceremony” (hence the bronze), hosted by former Blackhawks Patrick Sharp and Adam Burrish, began when a curtain unveiled the “statue,” which was, I remind you, actually just Nick Offerman, painted bronze. Then the “statue” proceeded to slowly sip whiskey—like, very slowly—for 45 freakin’ minutes. Is this brand marketing? Absolutely. Does that make it less deliriously weird? There’s video of the event, which unfortunately can’t be embedded, but you can watch it on Lagavulin’s Facebook page. Later, Offerman did a shoot-the-puck contest, but again, who cares, he was covered in bronze paint and sipping whiskey for 45 minutes. Lagavulin is a good whiskey, Nick Offerman is a cool dude, Ron Swanson would never, and the Blackhawks lost to the Calgary Flames, 3-2. That concludes this piece of journalism.

Each stage lends different qualities to the resulting single malt whisky. The traditional casks soften and add delicate character, the sherry wood brings depth and fullness of flavour and the final few months in our tuns allow the whiskies to marry harmoniously. 2017. I thought it would be interesting to compare the scores on an open 2014 bottling (had been open for about 3 ½ years) to a brand new 2017 DoubleWood 12 Year Old bottle. We have scored the 2014 bottling seven different times between us in the Proper Pour Whisk(e)y Club- twice known for me and twice completely blind; for Jeremy, he tasted the 2014 known twice and blind once. ] of the 2014 bottling it was tasted and scored 10 times by 7 different people in the club (I for example tasted it all three times). The average of those 10 scores was 87.7 points (rounded from 87.67 – you’ll understand the reasoning for the detail here later). Club members had not interacted with the 2014 bottle for 28 months before we tasted from the last third of the bottle again this past January.

© 2019 Drop of Whisky

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑